Below you will find the class and course information for Spring 2017. If you would like to view the course schedule, please view the Course Schedule – Spring 2017 page.

Download the Spring 2017 Course Descriptions & Information (pdf)

Contents


First-Year Courses (J.D. Program)

SPRING SKILLS SESSION COURSE (1/3/2017 TO 1/14/2017)

CONTRACT NEGOTIATION AND DRAFTING I 590 (3 hours – Skills)

The first semester of a coordinated two-semester coverage of intergovernmental relations in the federal system, powers of Congress, and the limitations imposed upon the powers of both federal and state governments for the protection of individual rights.

REGULAR SPRING COURSES (1/23 TO 4/28/2017; FINALS 5/1 TO 5/11/2017)

CIVIL PROCEDURE I 503 (3 hours)

The basic course on the structure and power of American courts, focusing on personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, and venue.

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I 507 (3 hours)

The first semester of a coordinated two-semester coverage of intergovernmental relations in the federal system, powers of Congress, and the limitations imposed upon the powers of both federal and state governments for the protection of individual rights.

CRIMINAL LAW 568 (3 hours)

The sources of criminal law, analysis of criminal intent, conditions of criminal responsibility and particular crimes and procedure in criminal actions.

LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING II 515 (3 hours)

Continued study and practice of refined and expanded legal research and writing skills, applying them to more complex legal problems, primarily using federal law materials and focusing on persuasive legal writing.

ELECTIVE (STUDENTS SELECT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING):

LEGISLATION 510 (3 hours)

The legislative process, national and state; the principles of statutory construction; and techniques of bill drafting.

CORPORATIONS 601 (3 hours)

A survey of the law of business associations, focusing on corporations and their formation, structure, finance and governance; close corporation problems; regulation of corporate disclosures and proxy solicitations under federal securities law; securities fraud and insider trading.

EVIDENCE 600 (3 hours)

The function of the court and jury; the competency, privilege and examination of witnesses; the exclusionary rules of evidence and exceptions.

 


Second- and Third-Year Courses (J.D. Program)

REGULAR SPRING COURSES (1/23 TO 4/28/2017; FINALS 5/1 TO 5/11/2017)

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW 605 (3 hours)

Powers and procedures of administrative agencies and reviewing courts at the federal and state levels, including federal and state administrative procedures acts.

ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH 720 (2 hours – Skills)

Legal and non-legal research strategies and resources (including materials in electronic and print formats) for specialized topics, such as federal and state statutory, case and administrative law, municipal law, legislative history, foreign and international law.

ADVANCED LEGAL TOPICS I 771 – Transformative Works and Copyright Fair Use (1 hour)

One of the most challenging areas of intellectual property law to practice involves copyright’s fair use doctrine. This mini-seminar is designed to inspire spirited class debates on the existing fair use precedent and how it should be applied to the proliferation of transformative works encouraged by today’s Internet society. This course will examine well-known parodies like SNL and Weird Al’s songs; mashups like those done by the artist Girl Talk; music sampling; Internet memes; and fanworks including fanvids, fanart, and fanfiction. Students should be prepared to engage in enthusiastic discussion and to bring their own examples of transformative works to class with them. The class will meet 6 times for 2 hours each on weekday evenings over the course of the semester. Enrollment is capped at 9, first come first served.

ADVANCED LEGAL TOPICS II 772 – Current Topics in International Law (1 hour)

From armed conflicts to refugee crises; from labor violations to trade disputes; from human trafficking to border disputes: international legal issues permeate our awareness of the world around us. This course will provide an overview of some of these current issues in international law, with a focus on understanding the legal problems they give rise to. No prior knowledge of international law is required. The class will meet 6 times for 2 hours each on weekday evenings over the course of the semester. Enrollment is capped at 9, first come first served.

ADVANCED LEGAL TOPICS III 773 – Advanced Appellate Motion Practice (1 hour)

For student currently enrolled in Criminal Appeals Clinic. For more information, please contact Professor Broadhead at pwb@olemiss.edu.

ADVANCED LEGAL WRITING 712 (3 hours – Writing)

A lecture/lab course to expand skills acquired in first-year legal research and writing courses.

ADVOCACY COMPETITION 761 (1 hour)

Participation in an external skills competition or similar program (including appellate advocacy, mock trial, negotiation, and other advocacy or skills activities). (Z credit).

BANKING LAW 607 (3 hours)

Survey of federal and state banking statutes and legal problems in the field of banking.

BANKRUPTCY 558 (3 hours)

Exploration of the legal, practical, and theoretical aspects of financial insolvency of both individuals and business entities under the Bankruptcy Code. Emphasis on topics that apply both to liquidations and reorganizations under the Bankruptcy Code, including involuntary bankruptcy, claims resolution, scope of bankruptcy discharge, executory contracts, trustee’s avoidance powers and distribution. In addition, the individual’s right to a “fresh start” will be examined.

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT AND THE JUDICIAL PROCESS 721 (3 hours – Writing)

A seminar course covering the philosophical and sociological debates over the death penalty, focusing on significant U.S. Supreme Court cases concerning the death penalty since 1972.

CIVIL PROCEDURE II 577 (3 hours)

The rules of pleading, procedure, and practice in the federal courts.

CLINICS

The University of Mississippi Clinical Programs teach essential practice skills and professional responsibility through a reflective clinical practice that provides high-quality representation to underserved clients. To accomplish the dual goals of educating students and increasing access to justice, the programs offer a wide range of clinical practice areas, each focused on an area of demonstrated legal need and each offering unique skills training experiences. The programs aim to graduate students with real-world experience, an understanding of ethical obligations, and a commitment to furthering broad access to the legal system.

For additional information see: Clinics Program Information

CLINICS: ADVANCED 765 (3-5 hours – Skills)

Students perform advanced work in a clinic during an additional semester.

CLINICS: CHILD ADVOCACY 690 (5 hours – Skills)

Students are appointed by the Court to investigate allegations of neglect and abuse and to make written recommendations to the Court regarding the best interests of the child. Students in the Child Advocacy Clinic conduct in-depth investigations by performing home visits, reviewing medical and school records, and interviewing fact witnesses. This section is offered for 5 hours of graded credit and is supervised by attorney David Calder.

For additional information see: Child Advocacy Clinic

CLINICS: CRIMINAL APPEALS 697 (4 hours – Skills or Writing)

A clinical program in which third-year students will directly participate in pro bono representation of indigents, through litigation of criminal appeals before the Mississippi Supreme Court, under the supervision of the clinic director.

For additional information see: Criminal Appeals Clinic

CLINICS: ELDER LAW 766 (4 hours – Skills)

Students write wills, prepare health care directives and Powers of Attorney, advise clients on nursing home and Medicaid regulations, and provide advice at meal centers and nursing homes. This section is supervised by Catherine V. Kilgore, Director of the Elder Law Project at North Mississippi Rural Legal Services.

For additional information see: Elder Law Clinic

CLINICS: EXTERNSHIP 654 (3-12 hours – Skills)

Work as legal assistants with prosecutors, defenders, judges, or attorneys in public service agencies with established internship programs. Prerequisites: Evidence 600. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Externship

CLINICS: HOUSING 691 (5 hours – Skills)

  • 5 – Low-Income Housing Clinic (5 hours). Students bring and defend cases, negotiate, and give advice in order to assist individuals and families facing conflicts with their landlord, eviction, foreclosure, or housing discrimination. Students take responsibility for the management of their own cases, meet with clients, interview witnesses, draft motions and pleadings, and appear in court. This section is offered for 5 hours of graded credit and is supervised by Clinic Director Desiree Hensley.

For additional information see: Housing Clinic

CLINICS: INNOCENCE PROJECT 692 (4 hours – Skills)

Civil Clinic is an in-house clinical program with a general classroom component and separate clinical units. Students may enroll only once unless they receive special permission from the clinical director.

For additional information see: Mississippi Innocence Project

CLINICS: LEGISLATION AND POLICY 693 (3 hours – Skills)

Students draft legislation and develop policy initiatives.

CLINICS: MACARTHUR JUSTICE CLINIC 733 (3 hour2 – Skills)

Students serve on a legal team pursuing impact litigation addressing criminal justice and civil rights issues in Mississippi. Students also assist with policy and legislative initiatives.

For additional information see: MacArthur Justice Clinic

CLINICS: PRO BONO INITIATIVE 713 (1 hour)

Credit for 50 or more hours of pro bono work, such as working for approved pro bono organization or project. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Pro Bono Initiative Clinic

CLINICS: STREET LAW 767 (3 hours – Skills)

Students conduct client interviews at the Oxford Food Pantry storeroom, where they gain invaluable experience in interviewing and counseling clients of the Food Pantry regarding public benefits, housing, family law, consumer law, property, wills and other civil issues. This section is offered for 3 hours of graded credit and is supervised by Minnie Howard, Managing Attorney at North Mississippi Rural Legal Services.

For additional information see: Street Law Clinic

CLINICS: TAX 768 (3 hours – Skills)

Students assist low- and moderate-income taxpayers with completing tax returns ranging from simple to business and international.

For additional information see: Tax Clinic

CLINICS: TRANSACTIONAL 725 (3 hours – Skills)

Students offer services to low-income entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations to foster economic development, increase access to capital, promote job growth, and enable sustainable home ownership, particularly in the Mississippi Delta. The types of work involved in the clinic may include: entity formation and choice of entity counseling, contract negotiation and preparation, corporate and commercial financing, shareholder agreements, business acquisitions and sales, commercial leasing, licensing, permitting, and zoning advice, trademark and copyright advice, registration and intellectual property licensing, corporate governance and compliance, tax exempt applications and various other kinds of business-related transactional legal work. The clinic is supervised by Marie Cope and Cameron Abel, an attorney at the Tollison Law Firm in Oxford, MS.

For additional information see: Transactional Law Clinic

COMMERCIAL PAPER 694 (3 hours)

Study of Articles 3, 4 and 4 A of the Uniform Commercial Code concerning negotiable instruments and payment systems.

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 764 (3 hours – No regular scheduled class meetings – Skills)

The Student Conflict & Conduct Management Practicum will allow selected law students to work within the Dean of Students Office as a mediator/advisor in undergraduate pre-hearing and administrative hearing processes. Law students will assist that office in handling the 500+ caseload per semester by learning the requisite legal and educational foundation and receiving proper training to meet with undergraduate students with student conduct issues. (Z credit §1; Graded credit for Advanced Practicum §2).

Note: Enrollment in this class requires the instructor’s approval, contact Macey Edmondson at maceye@olemiss.edu.

For additional information see: Mediation Practicum

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II 508 (3 hours)

The second semester of a coordinated two-semester coverage of intergovernmental relations in the federal system, powers of Congress, and the limitations imposed upon the powers of both federal and state governments for the protection of individual rights.

COPYRIGHT LAW 657 (3 hours)

Survey of copyright law, including copyrightable subject matter, the requirements for protection, the bundle of rights encompassed by copyright, infringement, defenses (such as fair use and the First Amendment), preemption issues, and some aspects of foreign protection. Resale royalties, moral rights, the right of publicity and other related doctrines also will be discussed.

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE I: INVESTIGATION 635 (3 hours)

A study of constitutional restrictions on criminal investigative practice, which typically precede institution of formal judicial proceedings, with special emphasis upon search and seizure, interrogation, right to counsel at the pretrial stage, and operation of the exclusionary rule.

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE II: ADJUDICATION 714 (3 hours)

A study of issues surrounding state and federal criminal litigation beginning with the decision to commence formal judicial proceedings.

EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION 640 (3 hours)

Employment discrimination as regulated by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other federal statutes.

ENERGY LAW 746 (2 hours)

The study of electricity regulation and electricity rate-making. The course will also examine regulation of the energy sources, including coal, natural gas, and renewables.

ENTERTAINMENT LAW 709 (3 hours)

This course examines legal issues relevant to the entertainment industry, including television/cable/radio, film, music, publishing, and theater.

ESTATE PLANNING 682 (3 hours – Writing)

Planning lifetime and testamentary dispositions of property; postmortem planning; analysis of small and large estates.

EVIDENCE 600 (3 hours)

The function of the court and jury; the competency, privilege and examination of witnesses; the exclusionary rules of evidence and exceptions.

FAMILY LAW 560 (3 hours)

The validity and requisites of marriage; the grounds for annulment and divorce; and the rights and duties arising out of the relation of husband and wife, parent and child, guardian and ward.

FEDERAL TRIAL PRACTICE 678 (3 hours – Skills – Note: ABOTA)

Use of federal discovery procedures, pretrial proceedings, and motions. Trial of mock cases, civil and criminal, under federal rules. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Evidence 600. (Z credit).

GAMING LAW 661 (3 hours – Writing)

This course will focus on laws that regulate, prohibit, or permit gambling in various forms.

GENDER AND THE LAW 742 (3 hours – Writing)

Explores legal issues of particular interest and concern to men, women and person who are “otherly gendered.” Focuses on the social construction of gender in our legal history and conducts a study of the American Jurisprudence’s treatment of gender-based social issues.

INCOME TAXATION OF CORPORATIONS AND SHAREHOLDERS 633 (3 hours)

Tax considerations in corporate formations, distributions, redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations. Prerequisite: Income Taxation of Individuals 613.

INCOME TAXATION II 702 (3 hours)

Advanced topics in the federal income taxation of individuals, including tax treatment of significant property transactions; consideration of timing of income and deductions; time value of money concepts; characterization issues; and additional treatment of special deduction limitation provisions. Prerequisite: Income Taxation of Individuals 613.

INDIVIDUAL STUDY I 615 (1-3 hours)

Research and writing on an assigned topic under supervision of a faculty member, or participation on moot court or mock trial teams at regional or national competitions under supervision of a faculty member. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Individual Study Application and Policy

INDIVIDUAL STUDY II 715 (1-3 hours)

Legal research and analysis on a particular topic assigned by the faculty, and the preparation of a written article. Prerequisite: permission of the supervising faculty member and the Curriculum Committee of the law faculty. Note: Student must apply 6 weeks prior to the semester start date.

For additional information see: Individual Study Application and Policy

INSURANCE 559 (2 hours)

The nature, form, interpretation, and application of the various kinds of insurance contracts.

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS LAW 752 (3 hours – Writing – §2)

Issues of the transnational flow of information which include both technical and social concerns that States have when international communication is involved.

Note: Course prerequisite requires students to be enrolled in the LL.M. program. If you are interested in this course, please send request to Law Registrar, Eddie Upton to add you to this class.

INT’L AVIATION FINANCING AND LEASING LAW 753 (3 hours – Writing – §2)

This course covers the primary legal and practical aspects of international aviation finance and leasing Law, and focuses on special international and national private air law (lex specialis) that applies to cross-border financing and leasing of aircraft objects. This course also addresses the relevant international disputes that currently arise in the international aviation finance practice.

 Note: Course prerequisite requires students to be enrolled in the LL.M. program. If you are interested in this course, please send request to Law Registrar, Eddie Upton to add you to this class.

JOURNAL OF SPACE LAW 583 (1 hour)

The Journal of Space Law is an academic review of national and international scope, focusing on the many aspects of space, remote sensing, and aerospace law. Research, writing, and editing assignments, and other duties necessary to the operation of the Journal

of Space Law. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities) except editor-in-chief only may earn one additional (fifth) hour for service in summer term. (Z credit).

LAW AND MEDICINE 695 (3 hours – Writing)

Medical malpractice litigation with emphasis on the physician as a defendant or as a witness.

LAW AND RELIGION 688 (3 hours)

A seminar course covering the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

LAW OF ARMED CONFLICT 531 (3 hours – Writing)

Examination of rules of international law applicable to armed conflicts, with emphasis on contemporary case studies; includes the law on resort to force (jus ad bellum) and the law on conduct of hostilities (jus in bello).

LAWYERING SKILLS WORKSHOP 551 (3 hours – Skills)

A simulation-based practice course, including exercises in interviewing and counseling, fact investigation, case assessment, negotiation, motion practice, trial practice, and ethics.

LEGAL PROFESSION 603 (3 hours)

Historical background of the legal profession, its proper functions in society, and ethical conduct in the practice of law.

MISSISSIPPI LAW JOURNAL 610 (1-5 hours)

Research, writing, and editing assignments and other duties necessary to the operation of the Mississippi Law Journal. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities) except editor-in-chief only may earn one additional (fifth) hour for service in summer term. (Z credit).

MOOT COURT BOARD 666 (1 hour)

Administration and supervision of the moot court system. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

NEGOTIATION BOARD 763 (1 hour)

Participation in and administration of the Negotiation Board. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

REMEDIES 642 (3 hours)

Legal and equitable remedies, including the law of damages, restitution, and injunctive relief.

REMOTE SENSING LAW 655 (3 hours – Writing)

Remote sensing is a valuable technology in science, foreign policy, national security, and commerce. This course provides an overview of international and domestic remote sensing law and identifies issues in the United States and the international community.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT I 760 (1 – 4 hours)

Research assistance for a faculty member. Requires completion of application form by student and supervising instructor. Please see Law Registrar for details. (Z credit). See Law Registrar for details.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT I 762 (1 – 4 hours)

Research assistance for a faculty member. Requires completion of application form by student and supervising instructor. Application due significantly in advance of enrollment. See Law Registrar for details.

RESEARCH FOR LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP 711 (1 hour – Skills)

Research for Legal Scholarship is intended to serve as a companion course to upper-level courses with a significant writing component but may be taken as a stand-alone course. The course will survey the resources and techniques used to conduct scholarly research, both online and in print. In-class and homework exercises will help each student conduct individualized research.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS I 698 – International Investment Law (3 hours)

International investment law is one of the fastest growing areas of international law, governing the relationship between foreign investors and host states. This course examines the laws, policies and legal institutions that influence cross-border investments by corporations and individuals. In particular, the course will focus on Bilateral Investment Treaties and the investment chapters of Free Trade Agreements, including NAFTA, as well as arbitration and judicial decisions applying these treaties. Other aspects of international investment, including national regulatory frameworks for foreign investment and contractual protections for investment, such as investment insurance, will also be examined.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS II 701 – Internet and Emerging Technologies Law (3 hours)

This class will focus on the challenges that the Internet and other emerging technologies present to existing legal precedent, with particular focus on intellectual property and privacy issues; the manner in which courts have begun to develop legal doctrines to cope with them; and the policy that can point the way going forward.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS III 703 – Fish and Game Regulation (2 hours)

This course will examine the federal and state management of fish and game, including regulation in Mississippi. Topics we will consider include: the common law underpinnings of the protection of wildlife; who “owns” fish and game as property (private vs. public); the interests of hunters and fishermen; the management of common resources, like fisheries; conservation, including game and habitat protection; the intersection with the constitution and with water law and other regulatory systems; and inter-sovereign relations (state, federal, tribal, international).

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS IV 704 §1 – Bar Exam Skills (2 hours – Skills)

This class is for students who will be taking the July bar exam. Unlike a commercial bar review class, which focuses on reviewing the substantive material the exam will cover, this class will prepare students for the entire process of studying for and taking the bar exam. Students will develop a game plan for studying and mastering the material and will then learn techniques to master each part of the exam: multiple-choice questions, essay questions, and the performance test.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS IV 704 §2 – Depositions (3 hours – Skills)

In this course, you will develop the basic skills necessary to taking and defending depositions in a variety of contexts and engaging in negotiations for purposes of the settlement of litigation and “deal-making” in the non-litigation context through a combination of lectures, in-class demonstrations and team exercises. Students will be introduced to and expected to demonstrate deposition questioning techniques and strategies, deposition planning and organization as well as the skills and strategies which form the basis of effective negotiations. (Z credit).

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS V 705 – Advanced Torts (2 hours – Writing w/ Instructor Consent)

This course will cover some or all of the following topics: defamation, privacy, misuse of legal procedure, interferences with advantage relations, statutory torts, civil rights, products liability and other possible areas of Torts not covered in the required first-year course. It is a standard lecture course, with the possibility of some drafting of legal documents and other exercises to develop practice skills. Note: exam or paper course, at the professor’s discretion.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS VI 706 – Mississippi Judicial Practice (2 hours)

The class will be designed to introduce students to all facets of law practice in Mississippi Courts (state and federal). Current and former judges will lecture on subjects ranging from ethics in the courtroom, attorney civility, procedural and substantive practice in trial and appellate courts, etc.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS VII 707 – Solo/Small Firm Seminar (1 hour)

This one-semester overview is designed to give students information to decide if returning to their hometown to create a solo or small firm practice is a viable alternative to traditional ways of seeking employment after graduation, including choosing a location for a law office; existing technology for automated telephone reception, calendaring of client appointments and court dates, and “paperless” file management; client management and relations; professional liability, office property, and premises insurance; identifying experienced lawyers willing to serve as mentors; hiring staff, managing employees, and the supervision of staff relations; law practice marketing; tax consequences and requirements; and setting up business, trust, IOLTA, and personal bank accounts. Students will create their own business plan at the end of the semester and deliver five-minute marketing speech during the last class.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS VII 708 – Healthcare Law III (3 hours)

This Course is a seminar focused on the fraud and abuse laws that have been set in place to govern the interactions between all healthcare providers and the federal payors – Medicare and Medicaid. These laws are detailed and complicated, and impact the activities of healthcare providers in myriad ways on a daily basis – from recruiting and contracting with physicians, to leasing space, to purchasing equipment, to actual treatment of patients and billing of claims for reimbursement to Medicare and Medicaid. Every healthcare lawyer must, in short order, gain intimate familiarity with these laws, their exceptions and safe harbors, and the various implementing Government regulations and pronouncements. This Course will give students with an interest in a healthcare practice the foundational knowledge they will need to begin representing healthcare providers as clients. It will, more importantly, provide them with a base of knowledge that will make them an immediate asset to firms looking for associates to assist in this ever growing area of the law.

SPORTS LAW REVIEW 611 (1 hour)

Research, writing, and editing assignments and other duties necessary to the operation of the Sports Law Review. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total (five for EIC) for co- curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

TRIAL ADVOCACY BOARD 664 (1 hour)

Participation in the administration of the Trial Advocacy Board. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

U.S. NATIONAL AVIATION LAW (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course covers domestic aviation laws, regulations and policy and explores all major aspects of aviation law, including, but not limited to: government regulation, liability, aircraft financing, economic regulation of domestic air routes and rates; aviation security and environmental law.

UNITED STATES DOMESTIC SPACE LAW 679 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course covers the most developed body of domestic space law in the world: that of the United States. It addresses the nation’s civil and military programs and offers a wide variety of commercial activities: launches, remote sensing, and satellite communications, among others.


LL.M. Program Courses (Available to J.D. students working on Remote Sensing, Air and Space Law Certificate)

REGULAR SPRING COURSES (1/23 TO 4/28/2017; FINALS 5/1 TO 5/11/2017)

INTERNATIONAL SPACE LAW 680 (3 hours – §1 – Writing or Exam)

This course explores issues of public and private international law applicable to activities in outer space. Specific topics covered include the nature and sources of international space law, international space law treaties, the relationship of international space law to U.S. domestic law, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, and the International Telecommunications Union. Legal theory and principles used in the advancement of civil, military, and commercial space activities are identified.

INT’L AVIATION FINANCING AND LEASING LAW 753 (3 hours – §1 – Writing)

This course covers the primary legal and practical aspects of international aviation finance and leasing Law, and focuses on special international and national private air law (lex specialis) that applies to cross-border financing and leasing of aircraft objects. This course also addresses the relevant international disputes that currently arise in the international aviation finance practice.

MASTER’S THESIS I 797 (1 hour)

Preparation of thesis proposal.

MASTER’S THESIS II 798 (1 hour)

Literature review.

MASTER’S THESIS III 799 (6 hours)

Drafting and completion of Thesis.

REMOTE SENSING LAW 655 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

Remote sensing is a valuable technology in science, foreign policy, national security, and commerce. This course provides an overview of international and domestic remote sensing law and identifies issues in the United States and the international community.

U.S. NATIONAL AVIATION LAW (3 hours – §1 – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course covers domestic aviation laws, regulations and policy and explores all major aspects of aviation law, including, but not limited to: government regulation, liability, aircraft financing, economic regulation of domestic air routes and rates; aviation security and environmental law.

UNITED STATES DOMESTIC SPACE LAW 679 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course covers the most developed body of domestic space law in the world: that of the United States. It addresses the nation’s civil and military programs and offers a wide variety of commercial activities: launches, remote sensing, and satellite communications, among others.