Below you will find the class and course information for Spring 2016. If you would like to view the course schedule, please view the Course Schedule – Fall 2016 page.

Download the Fall 2016 Course Descriptions & Information (pdf)

Contents


First-Year Courses (J.D. Program)

CONTRACTS 501 (4 hours)

The law of enforceable promises, including contract formation, interpretation, conditions, breach, performance and remedies, as well as promissory estoppel and restitution.

LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING I 514 (3 hours)

Continued study and practice of refined and expanded legal research and writing skills, applying them to more complex legal problems, primarily using federal law materials and focusing on persuasive legal writing.

PROPERTY 504 (4 hours)

Ownership and transfer of interests in land, including present and future estates, tenancies, easements, and covenants; real estate law and practice, with emphasis on mortgages, deeds of trust, and secured interests in real property.

TORTS 502 (4 hours)

Civil liability for harm to persons, property, and other interests, including negligence, intentional torts, and strict liability actions and related doctrine of causation, damages, privileges, and defenses.


Second- and Third-Year Courses (J.D. Program)

ACADEMIC LEGAL WRITING 745 (3 hours – Writing)

Academic Legal Writing is a seminar course on academic legal research, writing, and argument designed to help students prepare scholarly articles for publication.

Enrollment in this class requires the instructor’s approval.

ADVANCED LEGAL TOPIC I 771 – Law and Science Fiction (1 hour)

Many of the great works of science fiction deal with law in its various guises, some directly, others indirectly. This mini-seminar will explore some of the major themes of science fiction as they relate to law, including the law of war, AI and humanity, alien cultures, and law and trade. Course materials will include short stories, graphic novels, novels, movies, and episodes from science fiction TV shows. The class will meet 6 times for 2 hours each on weekday evenings over the course of the semester at the home of Professor Eliason. Enrollment is capped at 9, first come first served. Specific times and dates for meetings to be arranged once students are enrolled. (Z credit).

ADVANCED LEGAL TOPIC II 772 – Creative Writing for Lawyers (1 hour)

The construction of a powerful narrative from the relevant facts of the case is one of the most vibrant tools a lawyer can use in advocating for a client. Even transactional lawyers dealing mainly with contracts must be skilled in playing the imaginative game of what-if in deciding on contract language for future possible scenarios. This mini-seminar will use creative writing exercises to sharpen these story-telling skills. Students should be prepared to share such exercises during class meeting times and also to engage in supportive critiques of the works of others in the class. For those students with a love for creative writing, the course will conclude with discussions of publishing contracts and the intellectual property implications of many of the ways (including blogging and tweeting) in which lawyers write these days. The class will meet 6 times for 2 hours each on weekday evenings over the course of the semester. Enrollment is capped at 9, first come first served. Specific times, dates, and locations for meetings to be arranged once students are enrolled. (Z credit).

ADVANCED LEGAL WRITING 712 (3 hours – Writing)

A lecture/lab course to expand skills acquired in first-year legal research and writing courses.

ADVOCACY COMPETITION 761 (1 hour)

Participation in an external skills competition or similar program (including appellate advocacy, mock trial, negotiation, and other advocacy or skills activities). (Z credit).

AGRICULTURAL LAW 674 (2 hours)

This course will provide an overview of the legal framework governing agricultural operations, particular attention to environmental and land use regulations. The course will specifically examine how agriculture affects water quantity and quality, as well as the legal mechanisms in place to minimize such impacts. The course will also cover the intersection of agricultural

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION 651 (3 hours – Skills)

Introduction to nonadjudicative dispute resolution processes that utilize problem-solving approaches to resolve disputes, including client interviewing and counseling, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, summary jury trials, special masters, mini-trials and mediation-arbitration. Practical experience gained through role-playing exercises..

CHILDREN IN THE LEGAL SYSTEM 646 (3 hours)

Study of the law as it relates to minors in the public and private sectors.

CIVIL PROCEDURE II 577 (3 hours)

The rules of pleading, procedure, and practice in the federal courts. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure I 503.

CLINICS:

The University of Mississippi Clinical Programs teach essential practice skills and professional responsibility through a reflective clinical practice that provides high-quality representation to underserved clients. To accomplish the dual goals of educating students and increasing access to justice, the programs offer a wide range of clinical practice areas, each focused on an area of demonstrated legal need and each offering unique skills training experiences. The programs aim to graduate students with real-world experience, an understanding of ethical obligations, and a commitment to furthering broad access to the legal system.

For additional information see: Clinics Program Information

CLINICS: ADVANCED 765 (3-5 hours – Skills)

Students perform advanced work in a clinic during an additional semester.

CLINICS: CHILD ADVOCACY 690 (5 hours – Skills)

Students are appointed by the Court to investigate allegations of neglect and abuse and to make written recommendations to the Court regarding the best interests of the child. Students in the Child Advocacy Clinic conduct in-depth investigations by performing home visits, reviewing medical and school records, and interviewing fact witnesses. This section is offered for 5 hours of graded credit and is supervised by attorney David Calder.

For additional information see: Child Advocacy Clinic

CLINICS: CRIMINAL APPEALS 697 (4 hours – Skills or Writing)

A clinical program in which third-year students will directly participate in pro bono representation of indigents, through litigation of criminal appeals before the Mississippi Supreme Court, under the supervision of the clinic director.

For additional information see: Criminal Appeals Clinic

CLINICS: ELDER LAW 766 (4 hours – Skills)

Students write wills, prepare health care directives and Powers of Attorney, advise clients on nursing home and Medicaid regulations, and provide advice at meal centers and nursing homes. This section is supervised by Catherine V. Kilgore, Director of the Elder Law Project at North Mississippi Rural Legal Services.

For additional information see: Elder Law Clinic

CLINICS: EXTERNSHIP 654 (3-12 hours – Skills)

Work as legal assistants with prosecutors, defenders, judges, or attorneys in public service agencies with established internship programs. Prerequisites: Evidence 600. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Externship

CLINICS: INNOCENCE PROJECT 692 (4 hours – Skills)

Civil Clinic is an in-house clinical program with a general classroom component and separate clinical units. Students may enroll only once unless they receive special permission from the clinical director.

For additional information see: Mississippi Innocence Project

CLINICS: MACARTHUR JUSTICE CLINIC 733 (4 hours – Skills)

Students serve on a legal team pursuing impact litigation addressing criminal justice and civil rights issues in Mississippi. Students also assist with policy and legislative initiatives.

For additional information see: MacArthur Justice Clinic

CLINICS: PRO BONO INITIATIVE 713 (1 hour)

Credit for 50 or more hours of pro bono work, such as working for approved pro bono organization or project. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Pro Bono Initiative Clinic

CLINICS: STREET LAW 767 (3 hours – Skills)

Students conduct client interviews at the Oxford Food Pantry storeroom, where they gain invaluable experience in interviewing and counseling clients of the Food Pantry regarding public benefits, housing, family law, consumer law, property, wills and other civil issues. This section is offered for 3 hours of graded credit and is supervised by Minnie Howard, Managing Attorney at North Mississippi Rural Legal Services.

For additional information see: Street Law Clinic

CLINICS: TRANSACTIONAL 725 (3 hours – Skills)

Students offer services to low-income entrepreneurs and non-profit organizations to foster economic development, increase access to capital, promote job growth, and enable sustainable home ownership, particularly in the Mississippi Delta. The types of work involved in the clinic may include: entity formation and choice of entity counseling, contract negotiation and preparation, corporate and commercial financing, shareholder agreements, business acquisitions and sales, commercial leasing, licensing, permitting, and zoning advice, trademark and copyright advice, registration and intellectual property licensing, corporate governance and compliance, tax exempt applications and various other kinds of business-related transactional legal work. The clinic is supervised by Marie Cope and Cameron Abel, an attorney at the Tollison Law Firm in Oxford, MS.

For additional information see: Transactional Law Clinic

COASTAL AND OCEAN LAW 675 (3 hours)

The legal framework associated with the coastal zone and ocean environment. Public access to coastal lands and waters, public trust, wetlands regulation, international law of the sea, fisheries law, and marine pollution.

COMPARATIVE SPACE LAW 677 (3 hours – Writing)

Survey the comparative national regulatory frameworks governing space activities, with a particular focus on the legal frameworks that govern private and governmental entities engaged in commercial space activities.

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 764 (3 hours – No regular scheduled class meetings)

The Student Conflict & Conduct Management Practicum will allow selected law students to work within the Dean of Students Office as a mediator/advisor in undergraduate pre-hearing and administrative hearing processes. Law students will assist that office in handling the 500+ caseload per semester by learning the requisite legal and educational foundation and receiving proper training to meet with undergraduate students with student conduct issues. (Z credit §1; Graded credit for Advanced Practicum §2).

For additional information and application see: Conflict Management Practicum

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II 508 (3 hours)

The second semester of a coordinated two-semester coverage of intergovernmental relations in the federal system, powers of Congress and the limitations imposed upon the powers of both federal and state governments for the protection of individual rights.

CORPORATE FINANCE LAW 606 (3 hours)

The law governing corporate finance and acquisitions, including enterprise valuation, capital structure, dividend policy, mergers, takeovers, and takeover defenses.

ORPORATIONS 601 (3 hours)

A survey of the law of business associations, focusing on corporations and their formation, structure, finance and governance; close corporation problems; regulation of corporate disclosures and proxy solicitations under federal securities law; securities fraud and insider trading.

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE I: INVESTIGATION 635 (3 hours)

A study of constitutional restrictions on criminal investigative practice, which typically precede institution of formal judicial proceedings, with special emphasis upon search and seizure, interrogation, right to counsel at the pretrial stage, and operation of the exclusionary rule.

CRIMINAL TRIAL EVIDENCE SKILLS 748 (2 hours – Skills)

Uses role-playing and demonstrations to teach the practical application of the Rules of Evidence: skills will include objections; foundations; responses to various objections; motions; and other common evidentiary situations at trial. Students will not present a complete trial. Prerequisite: Evidence 600 and Criminal Procedure I 635. (Z credit).

CRIMINAL TRIAL PRACTICE 686 (3 hours – Skills)

State and federal practice and procedure in criminal cases involving written and oral exercises, including mock trial, the use of discovery procedures, pretrial proceedings, motions, and other aspects of criminal trial practice. Prerequisites: Evidence 600 and Criminal Procedure I 635 or Criminal Procedure II 714. (Z credit).

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 581 (3 hours)

The role of legal institutions in the protection of environmental quality, with emphasis on pollution and sound.

EVIDENCE 600 (3 hours)

The function of the court and jury; the competency, privilege and examination of witnesses; the exclusionary rules of evidence and exceptions.

FEDERAL JURISDICTION 696 (3 hours)

Emphasis on litigation against the state and federal government. Includes general grants of jurisdiction and current utilization in damage suits against the state or federal treasury, provisions of the United States Code that waive sovereign immunity for specific types of litigation, code provisions that authorize discrete causes of action and make provisions for attorney’s fees, and development of litigation that generates maximum economic impact.

FEDERAL TAXATION OF GRATUITOUS TRANSFERS 626 (3 hours)

Federal estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer taxes.

HEALTH CARE LAW 726 (3 hours)

A survey of legal issues related to the health care industry, including such topics as licensing, patient rights, antitrust issues and federal health care industry laws.

IMMIGRATION LAW 663 (2 hours)

A survey of United States immigration law and policy. In addition to a short take-home exam, there will be some skills/writing exercises during the semester — asylum, deportation, labor certification, etc.

INCOME TAXATION OF INDIVIDUALS 613 (3 hours)

Introductory income tax concepts, including gross income; deductions; identification of taxpayers; problems incident to the sale, exchange and other disposition of property; recognition; and characterization concepts.

INDIVIDUAL STUDY I 615 (1-3 hours)

Research and writing on an assigned topic under supervision of a faculty member, or participation on moot court or mock trial teams at regional or national competitions under supervision of a faculty member. (Z credit).

For additional information see: Individual Study Application and Policy

INDIVIDUAL STUDY II 715 (1-3 hours)

Legal research and analysis on a particular topic assigned by the faculty, and the preparation of a written article. Prerequisite: permission of the supervising faculty member and the Curriculum Committee of the law faculty. Note: Student must apply 6 weeks prior to the semester start date.

For additional information see: Individual Study Application and Policy

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 580 (3 hours)

A survey of the field of intellectual property law, including federal copyright, patent and trademark law, as well as state law doctrine relating to trade secrets, unfair competition, dilution, the right of publicity, and misappropriation.

INTERNATIONAL LAW 620 (3 hours)

The nature, scope, development, and jurisdiction of international law; treaties; state responsibility; dispute resolution; human rights.

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY LAW AND POLICY 658 (3 hours – Writing)

Legal issues relating to war and armed conflict, separation of constitutional powers, emergency powers, the security role of the United Nations, and the strengthening of the enforcement of international humanitarian law; related political, military, and diplomatic ramifications.

INTERNATIONAL SPACE LAW 680 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course provides an overview of current international space law in U.N. resolutions and treaties and customary law. It identifies legal theory and principles used in the advancement of civil, military, and commercial space activities.

INTERNATIONAL TRADE 575 (3 hours – Writing)

This course examines the legal framework, policy and jurisprudence of the international trading system, focusing primarily on the substantive legal rules of the World Trade Organization. Topics include the relationship between domestic and international law, the WTO dispute resolution system, non-discrimination obligations in international trade, regional trade agreements, subsidies, anti-dumping, trade in services, trade and the environment, and trade and intellectual property.

JOURNAL OF SPACE LAW 583 (1 hour)

The Journal of Space Law is an academic review of national and international scope, focusing on the many aspects of space, remote sensing, and aerospace law. Research, writing, and editing assignments, and other duties necessary to the operation of the Journal

of Space Law. One hour credited for each term of participation to maximum of 4 hours. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

LABOR LAW 614 (3 hours)

The regulation of relations between employers and labor unions at common law and under federal legislation, with primary emphasis on employee rights to organize and bargain under the National Labor Relations Act.

LEGAL PROFESSION 603 (3 hours)

Historical background of the legal profession, its proper functions in society, and ethical conduct in the practice of law.

MISSISSIPPI CIVIL PRACTICE 579 (3 hours)

Civil practice and procedure in the courts of Mississippi.

MISSISSIPPI LAW JOURNAL 610 (1 hour)

Research, writing, and editing assignments and other duties necessary to the operation of the Mississippi Law Journal. One hour credited for each term of participation to maximum of 4 hours, except editor-in-chief only may earn one additional (fifth) hour for service in summer term. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

MOOT COURT BOARD 666 (1 hour)

Administration and supervision of the moot court system. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

NEGOTIATION BOARD 763 (1 hour)

Participation in and administration of the Negotiation Board. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

OIL AND GAS 609 (2 hours)

Landowners’ interests in oil and gas in place; interpretation and assignment of related contracts and leases; royalties; and the conservation of oil and gas.

PARTNERSHIP TAXATION 634 (3 hours)

Tax meaning of “partnership”; formation transactions between partner and partnership; determination and treatment of partnership income; sales or exchanges of partnership interests; distributions, retirement, death of a partner; drafting the partnership agreement. Prerequisite: Income Taxation of Individuals 613.

POLITICAL AND CIVIL RIGHTS 662 (3 hours – Writing)

Studies in the field of personal liberties (freedom of speech, religion, association), political rights (apportionment), and civil rights (personal violence, education, voting, and employment).

PRETRIAL PRACTICE 544 (3 hours – Skills)

Instruction and practice in the legal skills needed for pretrial practice in federal and state courts, including pretrial planning, investigation, pleading, discovery, motions, and settlement.

PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL AIR LAW 751 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

Covers the unification of private international air law through the adoption of international conventions.

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL AIR LAW 750 (3 hours – Writing)

Examines the relevant principles of public international law that apply to the use of air space by examining the sources of international air law and the law-making processes affecting the regime of air space and international air transport.

Note: Course prerequisite requires students to be enrolled in the LL.M. program. If you are interested in this course, please send request to Law Registrar, Eddie Upton to add you to this class.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT I 760 (1 – 4 Hours)

Research assistance for a faculty member. Requires completion of application form by student and supervising instructor. Please see Law Registrar for details. (Z credit). See Law Registrar for details.

RESEARCH ASSISTANT I 762 (1 – 4 Hours)

Research assistance for a faculty member. Requires completion of application form by student and supervising instructor. Application due significantly in advance of enrollment. See Law Registrar for details.

SECURED TRANSACTIONS 571 (3 hours)

Theoretical and practical justifications for the creation of security interests in personal property. Emphasis is on Articles 1, 2A and 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and bankruptcy law.

SECURITIES REGULATION 650 (3 hours)

An examination of federal and state securities laws and how they regulate securities offerings, issuers, markets, and market participants.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS I 698 – Litigation Against the Government (3 hours)

The course covers the fundamentals of litigation against both state and local governments, the use of class actions, and securing an award of attorney’s fees.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS VI 704 – The Business of Intellectual Property (2 hours – Writing)

Many modern businesses are started with a single asset – intellectual property. In this class we will explore the legal issues surrounding patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets in business. We will examine very practical aspects of intellectual property law from such diverse perspectives as patent development and licensing, the copyright licensing models used by the music and film industries, as well as protection and licensing of a business’ trademarks.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS IV 706 – Mississippi Pretrial Practice (2 hours – Skills)

Taught by Mississippi Supreme Court Chief Justice Bill Waller.

SELECTED LEGAL TOPICS VII 707 – Tax Policy and Estate Planning (2 hours – Writing)

Students will research and write on a topic involving current issues of tax policy, and wealth transmission. The class explores how the estate planner navigates the federal transfer tax and property law rules with sensitivity to a client’s personal circumstances and concerns in order to achieve the client’s objectives. We will also discuss tax reform proposals in both estate and individual taxation. Pre-requisite is Wills and Estates 516 (may be taken concurrently).

SENTENCING 668 (3 hours)

A study of the sentencing process. Topics covered may include: sentencing guidelines, sentencing alternatives, the philosophy of sentencing, restitution, forfeiture, probation and parole.

SPACE SECURITY LAW 736 (3 hours – Writing)

Addresses a wide variety of legal issues dealing with both the security of the space environment and national security derived from reliance on space assets, such as telecommunications satellites, remote sensing satellites and launch technologies.

SPORTS LAW 647 (3 hours)

This course examines legal issues impacting amateur and professional sports. Includes analysis of sports cases and materials that cover multiple disciplines, including contracts, torts, constitutional law, antitrust, labor and employment, intellectual property and criminal law.

SPORTS LAW REVIEW 611 (1 hour)

Research, writing, and editing assignments and other duties necessary to the operation of the Sports Law Review. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total (five for EIC) for co- curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

THE PROSECUTION FUNCTION 685 (3 hours – Writing)

Examines the role and duties of the American prosecutor from a historical, theoretical, and practical aspect.

TRIAL ADVOCACY BOARD 664 (1 hour)

Participation in the administration of the Trial Advocacy Board. Limitation: maximum of one Z credit per semester and four Z credits total for co-curricular activities (including law journals, advocacy programs, and similar activities). (Z credit).

WILLS AND ESTATES 516 (3 hours)

The execution, revocation, construction, and probate of wills and the administration of trusts and estates.


LL.M. Program Courses (Available to J.D. students working on Remote Sensing, Air and Space Law Certificate)

COMPARATIVE SPACE LAW 677 (3 hours – Writing)

Survey the comparative national regulatory frameworks governing space activities, with a particular focus on the legal frameworks that govern private and governmental entities engaged in commercial space activities.

INTERNATIONAL SPACE LAW 680 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

This course provides an overview of current international space law in U.N. resolutions and treaties and customary law. It identifies legal theory and principles used in the advancement of civil, military, and commercial space activities.

MASTER’S THESIS I 797 (1 hour)

Preparation of thesis proposal.

MASTER’S THESIS II 798 (1 hour)

Literature review.

MASTER’S THESIS III 799 (6 hours)

Drafting and completion of Thesis.

PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL AIR LAW 751 (3 hours – Writing/Take Home Exam Option)

Covers the unification of private international air law through the adoption of international conventions.

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL AIR LAW 750 (3 hours – Writing)

Examines the relevant principles of public international law that apply to the use of air space by examining the sources of international air law and the law-making processes affecting the regime of air space and international air transport.

SPACE SECURITY LAW 736 (3 hours – Writing)

Addresses a wide variety of legal issues dealing with both the security of the space environment and national security derived from reliance on space assets, such as telecommunications satellites, remote sensing satellites and launch technologies.